Your Resume Is Your Brand

Building yourself as a brandYou’re probably thinking, “I’m not a Fortune 500 company or a startup business, how can I be a brand?” As odd as it may sound, if you want to sell yourself to a company, your resume is indeed your brand.

Think about it like this, when you put your resume out onto job boards and online data bases, your resume becomes a tool that gets your name in front of hiring managers. In order to sell yourself, you need to brand yourself, especially as the most obvious and right choice for the job.

Use the following 3 points to stay organized with your resume:

  1. Use the same font and format consistently throughout your resume. Make sure everything is aligned with the dates and titles you’re presenting. An example below is what you should consider for your resume as most people like to read left to right.

COMPANY                                                                                                        Dates of Employment (Month and Year)

Title

  1. Next, take a piece of paper, separate from your resume, and go position by position listing off all of the different tasks, responsibilities, projects and activities you did while in that role.
  • Emphasize the outcomes on your resume, what did you accomplish?
  • What was achieved during a project or job?
  • Do you see a theme emerge?
  • Is there a particular and/or useful skill you acquired, learned or taught during your time with each of your jobs?
  1. The goal is to show progression/growth in your resume, not the other way around. Now put the tasks that make the most sense together and go back to your resume and highlight those aspects by using the following tips:
  • Bullet your information into three concise points – Have one to two sentences explaining or rationalizing a theme/task(s) you accomplished while at a particular position. Unless you have so many points to cover and you can’t condense them into three, add a fourth. Be warned! You want to be clear and concise with your resume so it’s not too long for a hiring manager to review quickly. This means avoiding paragraphs as no one has time to read a story!
  • Use action words – Utilizing words such as developed, managed, created, pitched, participated etc, will help spice up your resume. Don’t forget to include select phrases like liaison with, secured or promoted too. By presenting yourself in this manner you are allowing the hiring manager to picture what you could or will do for them when you become a part of their team.
  • Highlight keywords or phrases – Think of your resume in terms of a Google crawler trying to sift through all the information that’s available on the World Wide Web. You want your resume to showcase key words and phrases that a potential hiring manager would be looking for when using a search engine to locate a candidate. Sprinkle as many as you can within your roles or list them within your skills section. Either way, by including this information you’ve made your resume more searchable!
  • State your Objectives – Discussing what you would like to achieve is also important. State loud and clear what you are seeking at the top of your resume. Be generic or change the objective for each job you apply to – i.e. seeking a clinical research position with a global pharmaceutical company. This will be the first thing any employer will look at so it needs to stand out.

Your resume shows who you are as a potential employee. Don’t be afraid to make alternative versions for each type of role or position you’re applying for. Not only does this get your name out in the social sphere, but it allows you to tailor yourself for different opportunities available. With a little tweaking, you’ll be on your way to the right job before you know it.

Once you’ve changed your resume and feel you’re up for the challenge, take a look at our Talent Network to see what jobs we have available and apply to a few. Who knows, maybe your updated resume might just land you an amazing opportunity with Townsend & Associates!